Three brain images.jpg

NOISE IN NEUROSCIENCE

Promoting accurate and responsible communication of research on sex/gender and the brain

 

ABOUT THIS PROJECT

Overstated and misleading claims about the scientific evidence for sex/gender differences in the brain are too common: in popular books, the media, business training courses, and in the scientific literature itself. 


This can serve to maintain and develop gender stereotypes, which limit people’s potential and cause lifelong harm. 


We want to put a decisive stop to this avoidable problem by creating an authoritative set of good practice guidelines for responsible communication of sex difference research.


The guidelines will be developed by an eminent academic panel working in partnership with the Royal Statistical Society and others. 


We welcome your input to our call for evidence to help shape the guidelines and make them a success. This is a quick survey (about 3 minutes), open to all, so you can let us know your views on what the guidelines should cover, and point us to good or poor practice examples of communicating research findings on sex/gender and the brain.

With your help we can make a step-change in this critical aspect of good science communication. 

 

The Munker-White illusion

The brains in the image above and in the video below are all the same colour. The only change is to overlay different coloured horizontal lines. In an effect known as the Munker-White illusion, these lines distort our perception.

Overstated and misleading claims about research findings on sex/gender and the brain can have a similarly distorting effect on our perception of ourselves and each other.

Image based on an original by Professor David Novick, University of Texas, El Paso.